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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
house did during the benghazi attack. he told "foreign policy" magazine, quote, we need to know what the president's conversations were. i would vote no on cloture on thursday unless the information is provided. by tuesday -- actually by yesterday, which almost every day of the week he's changed his mind, the white house had responded to his satisfaction, but he still didn't vote for cloture. he still wouldn't vote to bring this matter of hagel's confirmation up to a vote, and here is his latest. let's watch. >> there are still questions outstanding. i believe that senators have the right to have those questions answered. the senator from south carolina and the senator from new hampshire and i had a response from the president today on the question that we had, but there are other questions. >> like can you give us a copy of every speech you ever gave? can you give us a dollar-for-dollar assessment of every dollar you ever made? by the way, if you don't tell us, we're going to accuse you of getting money from the north koreans. that's the way we will pay you. joy, you're younger than
of other issues from energy to manufacturing, touched on foreign policy and at the end reached, i think it's fair to say, an emotional crescendo when he talked about gun violence in america and recognized a number of individuals there in the house chamber who have been touched by gun violence. either they're the survivors, surviving family members or who themselves have been victims of gun violence. mark, we were counting, i think, as he went through... i know i made some notes. almost a dozen new initiatives the president announced on everything from international trade to higher education to doing something about the voting experience in america. it seemed like the president was trying to inject some energy into his second term. >> i agree wu, judy. i just want to underline the emotional apex of the evening was undoubtedly the "deserve a vote" chant that the president led when he spoke on gun control and the need, making the argument that our police departments were outgunned by those with assault weapons with criminal intent. and i thought that a speech that quite frankly lacked a lot o
foreign policy magazine, quote, we need to know what the president's conversations were. i would vote no on cloture on thursday unless the information is provided. by tuesday, actually by yesterday, almost every day of the week he's changed his mind, the white house responded to his satisfaction but still didn't vote for cloture. still wouldn't bring this matter up to a vote. here's his latest. let's watch. >> there are still questions outstanding. i believe that senators have the right to have those questions answered. senator from south carolina and senator from new hampshire had a response from the president today on the question that we had. but there are other questions. >> like can you give us a copy of every speech you ever gave? give us a dollar for dollar assessment of every dollar you ever made. if you don't tell us we're going to accuse you of getting money from the north koreans. joy, you're younger than me, i think, by a lot of years and i have it to tell you, this does -- we're going to get to this. i'm going to sell this second segment coming up. we went back and looked
through a list of other issues from energy to manufacturing, touched on foreign policy and at the end reached, i think it's fair to say, an emotional crescendo when he talked about gun violence in america and recognized a number of individuals there in the house chamber who have been touched by gun violence. either they're the survivors, surviving family members or who themselves have been victims of gun violence. mark, we were counting, i think, as he went through... i know i made some notes. almost a dozen new initiatives the president announced on everything from international trade to higher education to doing something about the voting experience in america. it seemed like the president was trying to inject some energy into his second term. >> i agree wu, judy. i just want to underline the emotional apex of the evening was undoubtedly the "deserve a vote" chant that the president led when he spoke on gun control and the need, making the argument that our police departments were outgunned by those with assault weapons with criminal intent. and i thought that a speech that quite fr
talk about foreign policy, it's a direct impact on the department of defense and these are exact questions we should be asking. >> heather: and this is not unprecedented. there are two other times that a cabinet secretary needed 60 votes and both of those bush nominees facing harry reid and democrats and environmental agency head. both had to meet 60 vote threshold. now it has happened to hagel. the third time in ten years. so it's not unprecedented. my question to you, why rush it? >> because the department of defense is responsible for our military. we are currently in conflict right now. i think this is something that has to deal with national security. you really need to get serious and get to work here. we can't be talking about things that are not relevant. they are asking for information about benghazi and chuck hagel had nothing to do with benghazi. if you wanted questions about that you need to talk on other people. >> heather: they got one of those questions answered, that is whether or not president obama himself personally called libyan officials on the night of septe
've covered foreign policy in washington for a long time. can you put this into some kind of perspective, historically? how rare is it for this to happen to a president's nominee? >> well, this is very rare. i mean, it's unprecedented. i covered the john tower nomination. he was the former chairman of the committee of the armed services committee. and that was also something that john mccain brought up yesterday. that's part of the grudge match. he wasn't filibustered because the administration just lost that one. but this filibuster with a recess permits the opposition to keep upping the ante. i mean, one of the things that you and joe are pointing out here is that every time chuck hagel turns a corner, they're flowing something else up there. benghazi wasn't even on his watch. they used it to try to get leverage. to try to get more information about what the president did on that night. did he go to bed? was he calling the pentagon? who was in charge? something that they could have asked in another context. they did get a letter from the white house lawyer yesterday which responded at
issues, senior posts, foreign policy, and the republican party's reaction has been to spaz out, and it makes them look bad. >> speaking of spazing out, we have to leave it there. thank you, ari, nia, sam, and carrie. that's all for "now." see you tomorrow when i'm joined by harold ford jr., cnbc's andrew ross sorkin, ryan grim, heather mcgehee, and actress and activist kristen davis. until then, you can find us at facebook.com/now with alex. andrea mitchell reports is next. it's tax refund time and wesley & ashley are looking for a brand new smartphone. let's go. we've got a samsung galaxy sii on t-mobile monthly4g for only $299 with no annual contract. nice! [ earl ] see for yourself. get the samsung galaxy s ii on t-mobile's nationwide 4g network. walmart. i just served my mother-in-law your chicken noodle soup but she loved it so much... i told her it was homemade. everyone tells a little white lie now and then. but now she wants my recipe [ clears his throat ] [ softly ] she's right behind me isn't she? [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup.
for which the war turns. >> overseas, does it have any effect, any foreign policy implications? >> is certainly did have an effect overseas. in the month over january 1st, 50 public meetings were held around the u.k. thousands of people attended these meetings and praised the lincoln administration, praised the united states for the emancipation proclamation. it ended, i think, for definitively any possibility of british intervention on behalf of the confederacy, which had a potential problem, potential danger to the union cause right up until the emancipation proclamation and after it. it precluded the possibility of an intervention, which had been a live auction up until that time. >> anything else you would like to say about your book before we turn it over to the audience for questions? >> fire. [laughter] [applause] >> i just want to say one word about jim's book as his publicity agent. one of the things they think is very good and important about the book as it urges us to get away from the dichotomy is the road at the union or is the work of slavery? he shows both issues
will be back home by this time yex neanext year. it is a big foreign policy to be made, it's expected to be largely about economic issues and the middle class. >> what do you think, is it going to be partisan or more of an olive branch? >> i don't think it will be either, if i can be so bold as to take something that you're not offering a choice that you're not offering. >> you may take it as always. >> i think he will be assertive. i think he will not perceive, he and the white house will not perceive what he's saying as overtly confrontational. i'm sure it will be interpreted that way. i don't anticipate a big olive branch of a speech. he'll talk about common sense measures republicans have supported in the past and stlu as bipartisan. >> the agenda on immigration, gun control, climate by definition, pre-stage conflict with republicans who are ambivalent at best about moving forward on anything. on the other hand, on the big issue of the debt and deficit, since the summer of 2011 he has signaled that he is willing to make a big deal, including some elements, maybe less than two year
the programs, i don't develop policy, i don't do foreign policy or military policy or military objectives. once congress and the executive branch decide what the policy or program is, then we see how well it's done and if there are problems, we make recommendations. going back to the taxation issue, it's a critical issue. now the afghan government, what they collect is about $2 billion per year. just paying for the afghan national security force is over $4 billion. then and all the other programs. the problem is there's a delta between what the afghans collect and it cost of running their government, the cost of fighting the taliban, the cost of maintaining order. that difference is being supported by the united states taxpayer and by our allies. but it is conditioned. the caller and others have some concerns about how well that is being spent. that is the value. a lot of discussion came out of the tokyo accords about the international community will not walk, but they're trying to put conditions on the ability of the afghan government to govern and to fight corruption. people see what happens
military and deals heavily with our foreign policy, you need someone that can get the trust of the u.s. senate. if you've had someone that's broken a lot of personal connections and has really upset, anger and inflamed a large portion of the u.s. senate, maybe they're not the best choice for the position. >> jimmy, is there anything about this that says, look, this is a weakness on president obama's part? he's unable to get as a second-term president even his cabinet confirmed without this kind of melee. >> no, i think basically its illustrative of where we are in modern politics. i expect these kinds of things from the house. i expect the majority to rule over the minority in the house whether that's democrats or the republicans. that's the way the founding fathers set it up. but the senate was always supposed to be a club of 100, a cozy place. when i worked there, you could have disagreements on the floor. but off the camera, you had staffers, including me, running around, making deals, what do you need? i'll give you this if you give me this. this is what my boss needs. that's how
" focusing on foreign policies issues ahead on capitol hill. host: and now on your screen is representative elliot engel, democrat of new york and in the 113th congress the ranking member, the top democrat on the foreign affairs committee. representative engel, as always, we appreciate you being on the "washington journal." from that perch in the foreign affairs committee, what's your -- what are some of your issues this year that you'd like to confront? guest: well, obviously the president spoke at the state of the union the other night, talked about winding down the war in afghanistan finally and removing american troops. when the troops are actually all removed, still negotiations between us and the afghanis about what american presence will be afterwards. but that's, i think, something that the american people are tired of and happy to see winding down. we also, of course, have the volatile middle east, where we have the arab spring and egypt and syria, of course, in the throes of a civil war. assad brutally killing his own people. clearly he's going to go. the question is who comes in
in iraq, the decision to help prevent our losing that war when he said was the most dangerous foreign policy blunder since vietnam. it's quite obvious now that that statement was his tree i don't know nick, woe -- was histrionic, woefully uninformed and absurd. i didn't raise it at senator hagel's hearing for an i told you so moment but to determine he if senator hagel recognizes he was in error. and more importantly, if that recognition informs his judgment today. i wanted to know if he had learned from his mistakes. unfortunately, i'm not confident that he has. after two weeks of reviewing his record, my concerns about whether senator hagel is ready to serve as secretary of defense have not diminished. nothing in senator hagel's background indicates that he would effectively manage the department of defense. in today's unprecedented environment of fiscal uncertainty, ensuring that defense investment decisions affecting an agency as massive and unwieldy as the department of defense do not adversely impact our military readiness is enormously challenging. it requires that the secretar
certainly want better trade policies. i want more support and subsidies for american manufacturers rather than for foreign manufacturers but you can make sure the federal government is being a good steward of taxpayer dollars and using them to buy for from americans rather than foreign companies. host: 1 last tweet -- guest: you will never stop everyone from buying an illegal gun. that is always the case with laws we pass. if you want laws the one that% air tight, we should not pass anything. we're trying to cut down on the number of illegal sales oe
the world, senate foreign relations committee. chuck hagel, enlisted man veteran. >> pulled his brother out of a burning vehicle, leaving skardz to his body. these people are not, you know, light-weights. disagree with them on policy basis or whatever you want to say but they are not light-weights. chuck hagel, again, we talked about him a few minutes ago stand-up guy, john kerry, former nominee of his party to be president of the united states. these are not new people or lightweights. but they are not neocohs either. jake calling from eureka,cal. >> i think keeping them on the public airways will ensure the republican parties they are not the best face of the republican party. >> on the domestic side, they are trying to find this new generation, better faces, paul ryans and marco rub yes, sir talking about tupak apparently on interviews now. don't go away. don't go away. i want to hold on because we have something special coming your way a $50 gift certificate for pro-flowers you can use for this valentine's day and the rest of you type in press, you
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)